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UGA stem cell research uncovers importance of cell cycle

One of the biggest problems in stem cell research may not be a problem at all. Scientists have worried for years that stem cells grown in their labs were made up of many different kinds of cells, making them useless for stem cell therapies, but new research from the University of Georgia suggests they're not different cells, some are just more mature than others.

Amar Singh, postdoctoral associate in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, and Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar of Molecular Cell Biology Stephen Dalton worked together to uncover the mystery about why stem cell populations are thought to be heterogeneous, or made up of a variety of different cells. They discovered the heterogeneity, or difference among the cells, is largely determined by the cell cycle.

Their results were published Dec. 5 in the journal Stem Cell Reports.