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UGA launches Online Master of Internet Technology degree

The University of Georgia Terry College of Business is launching a new Online Master of Internet Technology program for working professionals to upgrade their business and digital skills. The program, which launches in the fall, is already accepting applicants who are seeking a flexible way to update their computer skillset and learn about project management and leadership.

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UGA students raise more than $200,000 to fight cancer

More than 2,000 students participated in the 15th Annual University of Georgia Relay for Life overnight from April 4-5 in the main gym at the Ramsey Student Center. The night culminated with the announcement that the student fundraising teams had raised a total of $202,568.27 toward this year's campaign. The top Greek fundraising team, Pi Beta Phi/Pike, raised over $22,000 while the top non-Greek team, Team Laura, raised more than $10,000. The University of Georgia's event is notable for being Relay for Life's first event organized by, led by and composed entirely of college students.

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UGA law school wins third national moot court competition of year

The University of Georgia School of Law recently won the 29th Annual Dean Jerome Prince Memorial Evidence Competition, which is its third national moot court title this academic year. Second-year law students Xon R. Hostetter, George S. Ray and Nicolas M. "Nick" Stanojevich represented UGA in the tournament, and Stanojevich was named the best oralist in the final round of competition. The team was coached by third-year law student Kenneth J. "Kenny" Bentley. The trio beat a team from the Campbell School of Law in the final round of the event, which was held March 27-29 in New York City at the Brooklyn Law School. More than 35 teams participated in this year's contest.

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UGA students to compete in 2014 Lafayette Debates

Two University of Georgia students will attend the 2014 Lafayette Debates hosted by George Washington University and the French government April 11-13 in Washington, D.C. Eilidh Geddes, a junior majoring in economics and math from Dunwoody, and Amy Feinberg, a junior studying public relations and international affairs from Canton, will represent UGA at the competition. Georgia Debate Union director and UGA professor Edward Panetta will join the students as coach. UGA is one of just 36 institutions from the U.S., England, France and the West Indies invited to participate.

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Thinc. Week to bring speakers, competitions, performances to UGA April 13-17

Thinc. at UGA, an initiative that encourages entrepreneurship, will host the second annual Thinc. Week April 13-17 on the University of Georgia Athens campus. The action-packed week of signature events featuring speakers, competitions and performances is open to all students, faculty and staff, and the public. More information about the initiative and the events taking place during Thinc. Week is available at thinc.uga.edu.

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UGA Costa Rica faculty residence to be named in honor of Paul A. Gross

The newly-constructed faculty residence facility on the University of Georgia's campus in San Luis, Costa Rica is being named in honor of Paul A. Gross, a 1961 UGA alumnus.

The Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia approved the naming in March in recognition of Gross' support of the international residential center and the UGA Costa Rica Program in general. University Cabinet also approved the naming.

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College of Education professor Karen Watkins inducted into AHRD Scholar Hall of Fame

Karen E. Watkins, professor and associate head of the lifelong education, administration, and policy department in the University of Georgia College of Education, has been inducted into the Academy of Human Resource Development Scholar Hall of Fame.

Induction into the Hall of Fame is the highest honor bestowed by the academy. Only one scholar is inducted each year. Recipients must have a continuing record of scholarly productivity and have received the academy's Outstanding Scholar Award.

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UGA awarded $1.4 million to study critical earth zone in Sumter National Forest

Looking back now, it's easy to see where farmers in the 1800s went wrong. Attempting to grow profits from a lush environment, landowners cleared entire forests in the South to make room for agricultural farmland. But using primitive agricultural techniques scarred the landscape, and when the profits dried up, they abandoned the barren land. Now University of Georgia researchers want to understand the ongoing repercussions of a bygone era. Five UGA researchers are joining with the U.S. Forest Service on the project to calculate how past land use has influenced the present environment-and how it will impact the future.

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First peanut genome sequenced

The International Peanut Genome Initiative—a group of multinational crop geneticists who have been working in tandem for the last several years—has successfully sequenced the peanut's genome. Scott Jackson, director of the University of Georgia Center for Applied Genetic Technologies in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, serves as chair of the International Peanut Genome Initiative, or IPGI. The new peanut genome sequence will be available to researchers and plant breeders across the globe to aid in the breeding of more productive and more resilient peanut varieties.

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NSF grant allows UGA researchers to monitor deep-sea plumes

Deep-sea hydrothermal plumes—waters nearly two miles down in the ocean—are home to processes that effect life across the planet. However, high pressure and water temperatures that exceed 300 degrees Celsius have made research on the plumes very difficult. With a new grant from the National Science Foundation, a University of Georgia researcher will develop instrumentation to collect data at these depths.